OFFICE LOCATION

Southern California Minimally Invasive Endoscopy & Surgery
2650 Elm Avenue - Ste 318
Long Beach, CA 90806

Contact Information:
Phone: (562) 426-0147
Email: southcalminimalinvasive@gmail.com

Services
And Procedures

Ventral Hernia Repair

WHAT IS A VENTRAL HERNIA?

When a ventral hernia occurs, it usually arises in the abdominal wall where a previous surgical incision was made. In this area the abdominal muscles have weakened; this results in a bulge or a tear. The inner lining of the abdomen pushes through the weakened area of the abdominal wall to form a balloon-like sac. This can allow a loop of intestines or other abdominal contents to push into the sac. If the abdominal contents get stuck within the sac, they can become trapped or “incarcerated.” This could lead to potentially serious problems that might require emergency surgery. A hernia does not get better over time, nor will it go away by itself.

HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAVE A HERNIA?

  • A hernia is usually recognized as a bulge under your skin. Occasionally, it causes no discomfort at all, but you may feel pain when you lift heavy objects, cough, strain during urination or bowel movements or with prolonged standing or sitting.
  • The discomfort may be sharp or a dull ache that gets worse towards the end of the day. Any continuous or severe discomfort, redness, nausea or vomiting associated with the bulge are signs that the hernia may be entrapped or strangulated. These symptoms are cause for concern and immediate contact of your physician or surgeon is recommended.

ARE YOU A CANDIDATE FOR THE LAPAROSCOPIC REPAIR?

Only after a thorough examination can your surgeon determine whether a laparoscopic ventral hernia repair is right for you. The procedure may not be best for some patients who have had extensive previous abdominal surgery, hernias found in unusual or difficult to approach locations, or underlying medical conditions.

HOW IS THE PROCEDURE PERFORMED?

Surgical procedures are done in one of two fashions:

  • The traditional approach is done through an incision in the abdominal wall. It may go through part or all of a previous incision, skin, an underlying fatty layer and into the abdomen. The surgeon may choose to sew your natural tissue back together, but frequently, it requires the placement of mesh (screen) in or on the abdominal wall for a sound closure. This technique is most often performed under a general anesthetic but in certain situations may be done under local anesthesia with sedation or spinal anesthesia. Your surgeon will help you select the anesthesia that is best for you.
  • The laparoscopic hernia repair. In this approach, a laparoscope (a tiny telescope) connected to a special camera is inserted through a cannula (a small hollow tube) allowing the surgeon to view the hernia and surrounding tissue on a video screen. Other cannulas are inserted which allow your surgeon to work with the instruments.

The hernia is repaired from behind the abdominal wall. A small piece of surgical mesh is placed over the hernia defect and held in place with small surgical staples. This operation is usually performed with general anesthesia or occasionally using regional or spinal anesthesia.

ADVANTAGES OF LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY

  • Less postoperative pain
  • Shorter hospital stay
  • Faster return to a regular, solid food diet
  • Quicker return to normal activities
  • Better cosmetic results

Inguinal Hernia Repair

WHAT IS AN INGUINAL HERNIA?

Inguinal hernia, the most commonly occurring type of all hernias, is more frequent in men than in women and particularly common in middle age. An inguinal hernia occurs when soft tissue usually fat or part of the intestine protrudes through a weak point or tear in your lower abdominal wall. The resulting bulge can be painful especially when you cough, bend over, or lift a heavy object.

Not necessarily dangerous by itself, an inguinal hernia doesn’t get better or go away on its own. An inguinal hernia can lead to life-threatening complications. For this reason, your doctor is likely to recommend surgical repair of an inguinal hernia that’s painful or becoming larger. Inguinal hernia repair is a common surgical procedure.

THERE ARE TWO TYPES OF INGUINAL HERNIAS:

- Direct: which goes straight through the muscle layers of the abdominal wall and;
– Indirect: which is one that goes through the inguinal ring into the groin along the inguinal canal

HOW IS THE PROCEDURE PERFORMED?

Surgical procedures are done in one of two fashions:

  • The open approach is done from the outside through a one or two inch incision in the groin. The incision will extend through the skin, subcutaneous fat, and allow the surgeon to get to the level of the defect. The surgeon may choose to use a small piece of surgical mesh to repair the defect or hole. This technique can be done with a local anesthetic and sedation but usually is performed using a spinal or general anesthetic.
  • The laparoscopic hernia repair. In this approach, a laparoscope (a tiny telescope) connected to a special camera is inserted through a cannula (a small hollow tube) allowing the surgeon to view the hernia and surrounding tissue on a video screen. Other cannulas are inserted which allow your surgeon to work with the instruments.

    The hernia is repaired from behind the abdominal wall. A small piece of surgical mesh is placed over the hernia defect and held in place with small surgical staples. This operation is usually performed with general anesthesia or occasionally using regional or spinal anesthesia.

ADVANTAGES OF LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY

  • Less postoperative pain
  • Shorter hospital stay
  • Faster return to a regular, solid food diet
  • Quicker return to normal activities
  • Better cosmetic results